• NOT MAKING LAND ANYMORE?
    It has been a truism for a while that there’s no more vineyard land to be had in Burgundy. However several new initiatives suggest that...
    Read More
  • HOSPICES DE BEAUNE 2018
    The Hospices de Beaune Auction is coming up on the 3rd Sunday of November as ever, which falls on the 18th this year. I have...
    Read More
  • Busy Months
    Retirement from the commercial world of wine has left me busier than ever visiting vignerons and vineyards and in between writing up what I have...
    Read More
  • Bien Boire en Beaujolais
    Bien Boire en Beaujolais This wine tasting event happens every year in April, uniting five groups of Beaujolais producers, individual domaines with a certain bias...
    Read More
  • Mâconnais thoughts
    For many years it has frustrated me that Burgundy enthusiasts don’t show a little more love to the wines of the Mâconnais. Smart restaurants may...
    Read More
  • Chablis 2017
    Whereas the Côte d’Or more or less escaped the frost in 2017, more northerly Chablis suffered colder temperatures in April and noticeably more damage. The...
    Read More
  • Grands Jours de Bourgogne 2018 Highlights
    Burgundy welcomed many thousand visitors during the week beginning 12th March for the 14thedition of the Grands Jours de Bourgogne. I have attended pretty much...
    Read More
  • January Wines
    Friday 5th January Dinner at la Tour d’Argent featuring a range of Dujac wines between 1972 and 1990. Best wines at each level? Village Morey...
    Read More
  • Fascinating Pinot from Japan
    Take a look on the Tastings page – I have written up the fascinating event I did in Tokyo earlier this year, tasting blind 40...
    Read More
  • Mature Volnay
    I have just returned from a 10 day visit promoting the Hospices de Beaune wines in various markets in Asia. Before the main work got...
    Read More
  • 1957 !
    The idea has been brewing for a while… my birth vintage, 1957, is not a great year anywhere in France, but the high acid wines...
    Read More
  • Pinot worldwide
    New Zealand My first visit to NZ was at least 20 years ago – by which time it was already clear that Pinot was going...
    Read More
  • News from North America
    California & Oregon The USA is easily the second largest Pinot producing country in the world, led by California, whose Pinot industry I have been...
    Read More
  • Burgundy 2016: Overview
    Review of the 2016 Vintage in the Côte d’Or What to Expect from this Report My aim is to give a relatively comprehensive guide to...
    Read More
  • Côte de Nuits
    Read about the villages of the Côte de Nuits each with Jasper's pick of the best vineyards and producers including: Chambolle-Musigny Fixin Gevrey-Chambertin Marsannay Morey-St-Denis...
    Read More
  • Côte de Beaune
    Read about the villages of the Côte de Beaune each with Jasper's pick of the best vineyards and producers including: Aloxe-Corton Auxey-Duresses Beaune Chassagne-Montrachet Chorey-lès-Beaune...
    Read More
  • Pernand-Vergelesses
    Probably the most characterful of the three villages which share Corton. The whites have some Corton-Charlemagne stony character while the reds have a delicious freshness...
    Read More
  • Vougeot
    Best known for its grand cru Clos de Vougeot, with some good 1ers crus alongside, especially Le Clos Blanc in white. The reds are sturdy...
    Read More
  • Vosne-Romanée
    Including Flagey-Echezeaux. The grandest appellation of all, marrying finesse and power. Noble wines at all levels, not just the greatest of the grands crus. There...
    Read More
  • Nuits-St-Georges
    Three appellations in one. Lighter, fine-boned reds to the south; deeply coloured powerful wines with sturdy tannins in the centre, and a thrilling concentration of...
    Read More
  • Morey-St-Denis
    Too often described as intermediary between the structure of Gevrey and the grace of Chambolle, Morey deserves more recognition in its own right. The wines...
    Read More
  • Chambolle-Musigny
    There is more limestone than clay in the soil, giving wines of exceptional grace as well as depth of flavour. They should be attractively perfumed,...
    Read More
  • Marsannay
    Promoted to village status (for all three colours) in 1988, Marsannay is discussing adding some 1ers crus. The reds are affordable and accessible while the...
    Read More
  • Gevrey-Chambertin
    There is something of everything in Gevrey-Chambertin. These are mostly red-fruited wines with a savoury character, delivering softer fruit or more rustic tannins depending on...
    Read More
  • Fixin
    Fixin and Marsannay used to sell most of their wine to customers in Dijon, and ran their businesses accordingly. Now there are some more adventurous...
    Read More
  • Volnay
    The hallmark is elegance. Floral notes, refined fruit, balanced acidity, few tannins from soil types favouring limestone more than clay. Once considered lighter and shorter-lived...
    Read More
  • Savigny-lès-Beaune
    Sitting a little back from the main Côte, the vineyards of Savigny are unnecessarily under the radar. The reds can have juicy red fruit along...
    Read More
  • Santenay
    From the southern end of the Côte, these vineyards were more famous in the past and could become so again. The best red wines have...
    Read More
  • St-Romain
    Situated at higher altitude than the other villages and tucked away behind the main line of the Côte d’Or, St-Romain produces fresh medium-bodied whites usually...
    Read More
  • St-Aubin
    Since the millennium, St-Aubin has come to be considered as the fourth major white wine village of the Côte d’Or, not just the best of...
    Read More
  • Puligny-Montrachet
    Great wines but few producers. These are the most perfumed of the great white wines with a firm, steely backbone to support the fruit. Lighter...
    Read More
  • Pommard
    Volnay’s gruff neighbour with little in common. Complex clay soils, often iron rich, deliver powerful wines with depth of colour, firm fruit and fairly substantial...
    Read More
  • Monthelie
    Located behind Volnay and Meursault, a red Monthelie is similar to a mini-Volnay but a little bit more rustic, mostly for drinking in the first...
    Read More
  • Chorey-lès-Beaune
    Beaune’s neighbour on flat land mostly below the main road. But it is good earth for easily accessible red wines and occasional whites. Look for...
    Read More
  • Meursault
    Fine 1ers crus, but also the best source of single vineyard village level white Burgundy. Rarely as buttery and nutty as in the past, but...
    Read More
  • Maranges
    The end of the line as the Côte turns from east-facing to the south. Tannins can be on the firm side but there is usually...
    Read More
  • Chassagne-Montrachet
    A handful of often intermarried families furnish many quality growers, each with a raft of 1ers crus which range in style depending on location- racier...
    Read More
  • Ladoix
    The least known of the Corton villages but they have had the sense to specify one colour only for some of their newer 1ers crus....
    Read More
  • Blagny
    A hamlet between Puligny and Meursault, using its own name for reds (mostly 1er cru) in an austere but pleasing style, or sold as Meursault-Blagny...
    Read More
  • Beaune
    The capital of the region, undervalued for its own vineyards and wines. The large producers often make a 1er Cru blend. Elegance and suppleness are...
    Read More
  • Auxey-Duresses
    This side valley may be benefitting from global warming as the wines become less austere, eschewing the hard edge which Duresses might imply. The best...
    Read More
  • Aloxe-Corton
    Best known for its grands crus Corton & Corton-Charlemagne. The village and 1er Cru wines have an earthy character with evident tannins in youth. They...
    Read More

Register with JMIB to learn more about Burgundy and its wine...

  • Receive details by email of the latest news to come from inside and outside Burgundy
  • Interact with other JMIB members by commenting on articles
  • Feel something is missing? You will be able to give feedback on the JMIB website
  • Manage your account so you are always kept up to date from JMIB
  • Registration is FREE and you can cancel your JMIB account whenever you wish.
  • Your Details

  • Minimum length of 8 characters.

Close
Register with Inside Burgundy

Register with Inside Burgundy and select a membership plan that works for you

Click here to register